More on size perception biases

Sam published a study investigating the spatial heterogeneity of size perception biases as estimated by our MAPS procedure used in several of our previous studies. Specifically, in a first experiment (which was conducted by research project student Samuel Spence a few years ago) we tested the effect of stimulus duration on perceptual biases and found that biases are stable for stimuli lasting up to 1 second. This is in spite of the fact that observers’ ability to discriminate the stimuli unsurprisingly increases with duration and that many observers also find it harder to maintain accurate fixation for longer stimuli. The biases in the appearance of stimuli therefore seems to be pretty fundamental.

In a second experiment, I then compared these perceptual biases between the visual field meridians. Our previous research indicated that perceptual biases were more pronounced at locations encoded by larger population receptive fields in visual cortex. In turn Silva and colleagues have shown that population receptive fields are larger on the vertical than the horizontal meridian. Putting those findings together, I hypothesised that the perceptual biases measured on the vertical meridian should be more pronounced than on the horizontal meridian, and the experiment confirmed this prediction.

Meridians-MAPS

Schwarzkopf, DS (2019). Size perception biases are temporally stable and vary consistently between visual field meridians. i-Perception 10(5): 1–9.

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